How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay


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The nature of the German state

Share Share this page on:. Article Index What is going on in Venezuela? Sanctions and Visa Revocations 2. Diplomatic engagement 3. What is going on in Venezuela? Sanctions and Visa Revocations U. Unsurprisingly, then, the United States stood idle as Europe moved closer to war. In , a civil war in Spain erupted, pitting the Republican Spanish government against the fascist forces of Generalissimo Francisco Franco. Franco received support from Germany and Italy, while England, France, and the United States—citing their desire to keep the Spanish conflict from becoming a second world war—ignored the Republican forces' calls for aid.

Franco emerged victorious in Hitler began his ruinous conquest of Europe in , marching his troops into the Rhineland, a demilitarized zone that bordered France, Belgium, and Germany. In late , Germany allied with Italy and Japan; it annexed Austria two years later. As Hitler eyed the Sudetenland a part of Czechoslovakia , France and Britain, who feared a continent-wide conflict, met with Hitler at Munich and struck what they thought was a peace-saving bargain: they would accede to Hitler's conquest of the Sudetenland in exchange for his agreement not to pursue more territory.

The deal was struck without the participation of the Czechs—and with the approval of FDR.

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Six months later, Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia, in outright defiance of the Munich agreement. It was clear that Hitler's next target was Poland, and Britain and France pledged themselves to its defense. In a masterful diplomatic move, Hitler concluded a non-aggression pact with the Soviet Union in late August , removing an adversary to his east. On September 1, , German forces invaded Poland. Britain and France responded by declaring war on Germany. World War II had begun. Nazi Germany along with its allies Italy and the Soviet Union now controlled all of continental Europe.

Only Britain remained free of the Nazi yoke. In the summer of , Hitler began a massive air war against England to soften its defenses in preparation for a full-scale invasion of the British Isles. Roosevelt's sympathies clearly lay with the British and French, but he was hamstrung by the Neutrality Acts and a strong isolationist bloc in American politics.

Upon the outbreak hostilities in September , FDR re-asserted American neutrality, noting, however, that he could not "ask that every American remain neutral in thought as well. First, it offered Britain both psychological encouragement and materiel aid, though often more of the former than the latter. Second, it bought the United States time to shore up its military preparedness, which was inadequate for a world war. Finally, it made the United States an active, if undeclared, participant in the war. In the fall of , FDR won a slight revision of the Neutrality Act, which now allowed belligerents to buy arms in the United States, but only with cash and only if they transported their purchases themselves, a provision called "cash and carry.

And in March , FDR won enactment of a Lend-Lease program that allowed the British and other Allies continued access to American arms and supplies despite their rapidly deteriorating financial situation.

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The war took a vital turn that same year. After failing to subdue the British through the air—the so-called "Battle of Britain" in which the Royal Air Force emerged victorious over the German Luftwaffe—Hitler made two fateful decisions. First, he launched a massive invasion of his former ally, the Soviet Union. Second, he tried to conquer the British by choking that island nation from the sea, ordering Nazi submarines to attack British shipping in the North Atlantic.

The two decisions only drew the United States more deeply into the war. More important, he ordered the American Navy to the North Atlantic first to "patrol" that region and then to "escort" British ships. This latter order allowed the Navy to fire on German subs at sight. By the fall of , Germany and the United States were at war in all but name. Roosevelt's leadership during this period was crucial, although far from flawless. He and British prime minister Winston Churchill formed an effective team, and crafted a joint statement of their nations' war goals, called the "Atlantic Charter," in August This cooperation extended to both leaders' subordinates, who began planning in earnest for the coming war.

At home, FDR managed to quiet the isolationist howls that greeted his "short of war" strategy and to further the process of rebuilding and re-arming America's military. Still, FDR rarely staked out policy positions which committed the nation to a clear course of action. Roosevelt's actions essentially placed the United States at war but FDR refused to acknowledge the danger, often responding with evasive answers to press queries about the difference between the nation being "short of war" and at war.

Finally, FDR often proved a confusing, frustrating, and spotty administrator as he directed the nation's military and industrial preparations for war. Prominent members of his cabinet and staff found all these failures exasperating. The immense challenges that Roosevelt faced in the European conflict were compounded by the worsening situation in Asia, and particularly by the downturn in U. In , that relationship deteriorated further after Japan attacked China, a nation to which a number of Americans had a strong attachment. FDR offered aid to China, although the neutrality laws and the power of the isolationist bloc in American politics ensured that such assistance remain extremely limited.

Instead, FDR's strategy, in concert with other Western nations, was to contain and isolate Japan economically and politically. If he could keep the "Japanese dog"—as Churchill referred to Japan—at bay, FDR reasoned that he could deal with what he saw as the more pressing German problem. In practical terms, FDR also realized how difficult it would be for the United States to prepare for—much less to fight—wars simultaneously in Asia and Europe.

The strategy turned out to have significant drawbacks. By isolating Japan, the United States and its Allies exacerbated Japan's fears of being denied access to the resources it needed to prosecute further its war in China.


  1. Japan–United States relations.
  2. Abschied in Moll (German Edition)!
  3. Winning the War for Peace, Justice and Prosperity: A Vision.

By the summer of , Japan's leaders felt increasingly hemmed in by a coalition of America, Britain, China, and the Dutch the ABCD powers and adopted overtly aggressive foreign and military policies. Japan invaded southern Indochina in the summer of to secure industrial supplies it deemed necessary to maintain its empire and military advantage.

The Roosevelt administration responded by freezing Japan's assets in the United States, and restricting its access to petroleum products. Japanese leaders were both furious and even more convinced that the United States imperiled their national interest. Roosevelt and his advisers, meanwhile, girded for war. War came, but in a most unexpected fashion.

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More Diplomacy, Less Intervention, but for What? Making Sense of the Grand Strategy Debate

The attack greatly damaged, but did not devastate, America's Pacific fleet, whose aircraft carriers were at sea. On August 9, a second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki , where 80, Japanese people perished. Critics have charged that Truman's decision was a barbaric act that brought negative long-term consequences to the United States.

A new age of nuclear terror led to a dangerous arms race.

Some military analysts insist that Japan was on its knees and the bombings were simply unnecessary. The American government was accused of racism on the grounds that such a device would never have been used against white civilians. Other critics argued that American diplomats had ulterior motives.

The Soviet Union had entered the war against Japan, and the atomic bomb could be read as a strong message for the Soviets to tread lightly. Regardless, the United States remains the only nation in the world to have used a nuclear weapon on another nation. Truman stated that his decision to drop the bomb was purely military.

A Normandy-type amphibious landing would have cost an estimated million casualties. Truman believed that the bombs saved Japanese lives as well. Prolonging the war was not an option for the President. Over 3, Japanese kamikaze raids had already wrought great destruction and loss of American lives. The President rejected a demonstration of the atomic bomb to the Japanese leadership.

He knew there was no guarantee the Japanese would surrender if the test succeeded, and he felt that a failed demonstration would be worse than none at all. Even the scientific community failed to foresee the awful effects of radiation sickness. Truman saw little difference between atomic bombing Hiroshima and fire bombing Dresden or Tokyo. The ethical debate over the decision to drop the atomic bomb will never be resolved. The bombs did, however, bring an end to the most destructive war in history. The Manhattan Project that produced it demonstrated the possibility of how a nation's resources could be mobilized.

How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay
How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay
How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay
How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay
How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay
How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay How American Diplomacy Made an Enemy of Japan an Essay

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